Thoughts on Pedagogy

See on Scoop.itTechnology Enabled Learning

Efferent versus Aesthetic reading – read to gather information as opposed to reading with a sensitivity to how it is written and the emotional reaction we have to it (images, associations, and feelings it invokes”.


See on people.emich.edu

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

what is praxis?

See on Scoop.itTechnology Enabled Learning

A definition of Praxis.  Can’t believe it’s only the second time I’ve come across this word (the first time was in a description of the work of drama students at the Centre of Speech and Drama in Camden).

 

Praxis is commited action.  Not only based on reflection but also a commitment to human well-being, the search for truth and respect for others.  What an unusal word!  But I would argue that an embodied learner would almost certainly be involved in Praxis.  I feel so good knowing what this is! 

 

Educators are involved with praxis: acts which shape and change the world. Adult education is ‘education for use’ (Lindeman 1944: 103). Yet few educators speak of praxis. Those that do tend to link it to the work of Freire.


See on www.infed.org

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Importance of a holistic approach to critical reflection

See on Scoop.itWearable tech and biosensors for learning

This article captures the importance of connecting to texts in different ways (holistically) in order to be able to read them critically.

 

In depth analysis of Quality Talk…


See on www.quality-talk.org

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Data fusion

Some gaps in the research that I’d specifically like to address:

3.3.2 Data Fusion: Objective, Self, Peer and Group

Assessment
One important aid to the reflection process can be the fu-
sion and comparison of objective (i.e. measured by sensors),
self (i.e. self reported data from the user), peer and group
assessment (reported data from others about a user). There
may be di erences and discrepancies between these views
that can foster reflection, can help to bridge the gap from
subjective to objective experiences and in this way yield new
insights and lead to learning. This relates to stage two of the
reflection process { attending to feelings. Negative impres-
sions can be discharged by comparing the individual per-
spective to objective measurements. Aggregation of subjec-
tive articulations over time or over di erent users can result
in a more objective view (see also [11]).
in other words …not just tracking reflections on personal data but triangulating it with biosensor data and peer/group observations and data.
and also this is what I want to explore..
Assuming that QS tools can be shown to help people
achieve their desired outcomes, there is also a luck of under-
standing on how to identify the situations where they are
likely to work, which are the right measures to track and
finally how to spread the user beyond the current relatively
narrow user base.
and finally..

The use of external data sets (such as historic weather data in fi tness applications) is even less common.

Applying Quantified Self Approaches to Support Reflective
Learning
Verónica Rivera-Pelayo, Valentin Zacharias, Lars Müller, and Simone Braun
FZI Research Center for Information Technologies
Haid-und-Neu Str. 10-14, Karlsruhe, Germany
rivera@fzi.de, zach@fzi.de, lmueller@fzi.de, braun@fzi.de
Sorry for the terrible refs
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

RiSR – A Wearable Sensor Network that Helps You Land Dates – Fashioning Technology

See on Scoop.itArduino Geeks


  I’m not a 100% sure if this is a spoof on wearable technology or a real product, but considering the longevity of the video, I do believe that RiSR is indee……


See on www.fashioningtech.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Value theory – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

See on Scoop.itWearable tech and biosensors for learning

Well, this is a bit of a wide ball but i feel as if it might contribute to an argument about QS as narcissitic (or not!)…..


See on en.wikipedia.org

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A balance

Might feeling excited but also concerned about a new trend in equal measures aid objective thinking?  or just it simply produce muddled thinking….at which I am already a pro….

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A different perspective

lovely anecdote today on radio 4 from a gentleman standing at the top of a mountain who, when looking down on his village from such a great height, finds himself reviewing his whole life, his achievements and mistakes, and is overwhelmed by feelings of remorse…

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How I think the criticisms might be countered…

I think in my mind, QS avoids narcissism if you are trying to resolve a disabling issue, or if the activities are contributing towards a larger effort, an attempt to understand the world more broadly (not just yourself).  It’s subtle though.  Sometimes I feel that just owning an all-seeing, all-doing, all-connected phone draws me inwards.  Same criticism with much of the current connected tech…we are increasingly social and connected – online…but what does it (necessarily) detract us from doing?

In fact – thank Lynne Clouder for this – Reflective Practice: Realising its potential

One criticism of reflective practice is its association with
the production of individual knowledge. The assumption inherent in this critique is that the introspective nature of reflection denies benefit to the profession at a wider level. However, this view is problematic because it ignores the dialogical potential of reflective practice. The importance of intersubjectivity and the potential for ‘communities of practice’ to enhance learning and professional awareness have been overlooked. From an educational perspective it is vital that professional socialisation of undergraduate students
incorporates strategies that facilitate dialogical reflection rather
than focusing solely on written reflection. In the workplace
clinicians may benefit from formal mechanisms to allow sharing
ideas as a first step towards shifting knowledge from the private to the public domain.

so – as long as we keep following Kolb’s cycle (or something similar…), as long as reflection is translated into action – not in circles but in a forward moving spiral…then we might say it is not simply self-obsessed and inward looking…and .as long as the greater awareness and progress that arises contributes to a wide exploration – feeds into the ideas of others?

and finally – education, wherever it takes place is ultimately a process of self-transformation – what separates it from self-help?  Think it must have something to do with turning it into a collaborative process.  Anything can become a self-obsessed activity if you do it too often and it isn’t make a contribution to society?  And what do I mean by contribution to society.

I wonder if this paper might help?
Value as Practice and the Practice of Value: Dewey’s Value Theory for Environmental Ethics, Paul Ott in Environmental Ethics journal
http://web.ebscohost.com.eproxy.ucd.ie/ehost/detail?vid=9&hid=125&sid=777201a1-91fa-4811-841e-ed8343a1d567%40sessionmgr104&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=a9h&AN=54523868

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

some QS cons…words of moderation

From Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen, Journal or Personalised Medicine, 12 September 2012
Melanie Swan

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:2OOMWPFfZN4J:www.mdpi.com/2075-4426/2/3/93/pdf+&hl=en&gl=uk&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESg2Y5g3bG9H8fsdxrBORocSL3mf5kxULAn6mMWrO_0sWMOpBOMkx3QA4rTmAyGvui2MZ6RPwdFeDqyQdd-st28AXzMAjGNN5N5lqmD4hZClPsF-ZZG1B8hNYlfoETtHoABkBjAx&sig=AHIEtbR-lZKxHvKzEIrrAeRSJwxB6bmPwg&pli=1

Some of the limitations (specifically for health, but I’m sure you could draw parallels with ed)…
The responsibility becomes that of the individual, including associated costs.
Crowd sourcing is fine to find solutions to certain issues, but for some things, a more rigorous, approach requiring expert knowledge is required.

3.4.5. Participatory Health Pioneers Are Defining the Preventive Medicine Mindset
While criticism has been levied against quantified self-experimentation and crowdsourced health
study participation as being the special-interest activities of a small minority of those particularly, and
potentially obsessively, interested in health tracking and improvement, it can be argued that these
pioneers are critical in facilitating the widespread realization of preventive medicine. It is the
‘Wikipedia-ization of health’ as a small number of contributors join to create a public good of
extensive and universal value. In technological and social movements, early adopters not only pave the
way at the practical level, innovating tools and experimental processes so that they can be made
cost-efficient and codified into effective means for attaining results, but also at the qualitative level.
Early adopters help to make new ideas and techniques known as initially being strange and
preposterous, but then more commonplace as a sensibility and maturity develops, and value
propositions become defined to different audiences. Self-awareness, self-tracking, monitoring,
experimenting, and action-taking are critical components in the preventive medicine movement, and
early adopters, health hackers, and gene geeks are expected to innovate at the radical edge as the first
step towards mainstream adoption. The full path to the realization of the personalized preventive
medicine of the future is just starting to be defined, and the way forward will likely be elucidated by
innovators, both institutional and individual, and then expanded as other groups see and implement the
value for themselves.
3.5. Limitations
There are a number of reasons that Health 2050: Preventive Medicine might not happen which
range from institutional change to human behavioral psychology. Some of the most important can be
grouped into five categories: technical feasibility, priority, human nature, timing, and criticisms of
participatory preventive health models. First and foremost is technical feasibility in the sense that
health research generally, whether institutional or participatory efforts, has not been effective at
finding solutions to the most complex health challenges (a recent high-profile example is cancer
immunotherapy).

3.4.5. Participatory Health Pioneers Are Defining the Preventive Medicine Mindset
While criticism has been levied against quantified self-experimentation and crowdsourced healthstudy participation as being the special-interest activities of a small minority of those particularly, andpotentially obsessively, interested in health tracking and improvement, it can be argued that thesepioneers are critical in facilitating the widespread realization of preventive medicine. It is the‘Wikipedia-ization of health’ as a small number of contributors join to create a public good ofextensive and universal value. In technological and social movements, early adopters not only pave theway at the practical level, innovating tools and experimental processes so that they can be madecost-efficient and codified into effective means for attaining results, but also at the qualitative level.Early adopters help to make new ideas and techniques known as initially being strange andpreposterous, but then more commonplace as a sensibility and maturity develops, and valuepropositions become defined to different audiences. Self-awareness, self-tracking, monitoring,experimenting, and action-taking are critical components in the preventive medicine movement, andearly adopters, health hackers, and gene geeks are expected to innovate at the radical edge as the firststep towards mainstream adoption. The full path to the realization of the personalized preventivemedicine of the future is just starting to be defined, and the way forward will likely be elucidated byinnovators, both institutional and individual, and then expanded as other groups see and implement thevalue for themselves.
3.5. Limitations
There are a number of reasons that Health 2050: Preventive Medicine might not happen whichrange from institutional change to human behavioral psychology. Some of the most important can begrouped into five categories: technical feasibility, priority, human nature, timing, and criticisms ofparticipatory preventive health models. First and foremost is technical feasibility in the sense thathealth research generally, whether institutional or participatory efforts, has not been effective atfinding solutions to the most complex health challenges (a recent high-profile example is cancerimmunotherapy).

One answer (taking the idea of narcissism literally)

http://quantifiedself.com/2009/02/are-self-trackers-narcissists/

And from this website – some words of warning:

http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Quantified-Self-Strategies-to-Improve-Your-Life

On occasion, self-trackers have been called obsessive, narcissistic or self-absorbed. Be careful you’re not teetering into being overly preoccupied with yourself! Moreover, if data collection turns obsessive and stops you living a fulfilled life, you’ll need to reassess its worth to you. If the data starts driving what you do each day, be sure to take care to stop this encroachment.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment